Mod revival

Mod gone wrong


I’m usually way behind the fashion curve. Is Mod style back in vogue? I couldn’t help but notice it got a big nod in the January issues of Matchbook and Lonny. So, I decided to do some digging.

First stop, wwd.com. Headline: “One of the biggest (spring 2013) runway trends was an ode to Sixties Mod with bold, graphic patterns and retro shapes.” Was I right, or was I right? I'll leave the spring lines to someone who knows something about fashion like Slim Paley (love her blog!) and focus on Mod history.

The Mod movement short for ‘modernist’ that originated in 1960's London was not just a fashion or a type of pop music but a lifestyle. The movement eventually made its way around to America, which I'll have to cover in a later post.

Mod style was generally characterized by very bold and bright fashions. The cuts were usually ultra-short and sleeveless. Miniskirts, jumpers, shift dresses, patent rain trench coats, patent leather go-go boots and tights were all the rage. 



Mod makeup was huge. Big, dramatic eyes were the ultimate fashion, day or night. Lips were usually left bare so that all the focus could be put on them. Layers of black mascara and eyeliner were applied all the way around the eye for major impact.

Hair was short often bobbed and stick straight. Thick bangs and pixie cuts were also in.

Let’s take a look.
Matchbook's January issue greets the New Year with a 15 page Mod-inspired photo shoot spread.

Modcloth-loafers
Pinch, Lash, Smidgen Flat by Modcloth. Adorable!



The Lonny Jan./Feb. issue opens to a two-page spread a "Mod, Mod World" inspired by 60's style icon Edie Sedgwick.

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Mark Jacobs at New York Fashion Week 2013.

Oscar de la Renta long tassel clip-on earrings.


THE MOD SQUAD

1965 "girl of the year" and Andy Warhol "it girl" Edie Sedgwick


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The Face of 1966 Leslie Lawson "Twiggy"

Mod hairstyle goddess Peggy Moffitt


Modeling her signature Vidal Sassoon "Five Point" Haircut.
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Love this!



Fashion designer Mary Quant  is credited with inventing the mini skirt, hot pants and patterned leggings.

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Special edition Mary Quant Mini Cooper. She named the short skirt "mini" after her favorite car.

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Postage stamp in her honor (2008)


My favorite Mod. I love Audrey's look in How to Steel a Million. Of course I love her any way.

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Annex+-+Hepburn%2C+Audrey+%28How+to+Steal+a+Million%29_12

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Mod Men

"King of Carnaby Street" John Stephen

John Stephen was one of the most important male fashion figures in the 1960's. He was the first to offer clothing to the mass market at affordable prices. By 1967 he operated a chain of 15 shops in central London. His stores were frequented by pop stars, which also added to his success. The Rolling Stones, The Kinks, The Who and Small faces were all sporting his clothes.
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John Stephen and Mary Quant (1966).

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Mick Jagger and Keith Richards shopping at John Stephen's (1965).

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Cool Cat David Bowie

My favorite summer nail polish color OPI "Mod About You."



Hope you enjoyed this walk down Mod lane. Mod revival: fab or flop? What do you think? I think it's a gas! 

3 comments:

  1. Just don't go get a Peggy Moffit hair-do, Maureen! But the rest is all fun. I was shopping today and I almost couldn't find any black pants because there were mass inventories of colored pants.

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  2. Fab post!
    I'm reading Grace Coddington's new memoir at the moment and quite a large part of the book takes place during this era in London.

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  3. Once again the fashion industry has gone for the stereotypical image of Mod: peter pan collars and Austin Powers. What they are actually representing is late 60s mainstream fashion which has been put under the label Mod. Which would mean a significant amount of the population was Mod, when it was actually subculture. It's kind of like people in the future seeing how the style of hipsters became mainstream and coming to the conclusion that being a hipster was the main culture among youth at this time, when it's actually a marginal (annoying) part of the population. *sigh* As a Mod girl, I wish the fashion magazines had done more research. There's more to Mod than shift dresses and gogo boots. This is a 60s revival, not a Mod

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